Surgery Career and Resource Center

Welcome to the LocumTenens.com Surgery Career and Resource Center! Here you can stay up-to-date on the latest news and trends in your industry, find links to organizations and associations, and more. Of course, you're only a few clicks away from finding the perfect surgery employment opportunity, too. Learn more about LocumTenens.com's surgery recruiting services.

General Surgery and Orthopedic Surgery Salary and Employment Statistics

The 2017 LocumTenens.com Surgeon Salary Survey annual reports are now available! Results from the annual LocumTenens.com surgeon salary survey highlight annual average surgeon salaries. Respondent demographics including region of practice, board certification, and time frame for making next job change are also covered in detail in the full salary survey report.

The LocumTenens.com surgeon salary survey resource center provides more detailed salary information, including historical data from 2006 through our latest 2017 Surgeon Salary Survey.

Postoperative cognitive dysfunction still a mystery to doctors and researchers

Source: Kaiser Health News

Little is known about postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD,) a condition that affects anywhere from 25 to 59 percent of older patients undergoing certain procedures and affects multiple areas of the brain including memory, learning, as well as using multistep actions. Some researchers believe it may be caused by the stress of surgery and not by the anesthesia used during procedures. One study is underway as a doctor puts patients under general anesthesia but does not perform any operations or procedures to monitor the occurrence and effects of POCD after.

View the complete article here.

New camera designed after butterfly eyes improves cancer surgery

Source: The Optical Society

A new camera modeled after butterfly eyes is being used to highlight cancerous tissue during surgery. The camera uses regular color images and near-infrared images that make cancer cells easier to see during surgery. The camera tested well on mouse models and when detecting lymph nodes in breast cancer patients at Washington University school of Medicine in St. Louis. Researchers are in the process of developing clinical trials and commercializing the new camera.

View the complete article here.