Surgery Career and Resource Center

Welcome to the LocumTenens.com Surgery Career and Resource Center! Here you can stay up-to-date on the latest news and trends in your industry, find links to organizations and associations, and more. Of course, you're only a few clicks away from finding the perfect surgery employment opportunity, too. Learn more about LocumTenens.com's surgery recruiting services.

General Surgery and Orthopedic Surgery Salary and Employment Statistics

The 2016 LocumTenens.com Surgeon Salary Survey annual reports are now available! Results from the annual LocumTenens.com surgeon salary survey highlight annual average surgeon salaries. Respondent demographics including region of practice, board certification, and time frame for making next job change are also covered in detail in the full salary survey report, which is available for download.

The LocumTenens.com surgeon salary survey resource center provides more detailed salary information, including historical data from 2006 through our latest 2016 Surgeon Salary Survey.

Light and sound imaging techniques improve time of breast-cancer surgeries

Source: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and California Institute of Technology have developed a new light and sound procedure to accurately differentiate cancerous breast tissue from normal tissue in record time. This new technique is quick enough to eliminate the need to pause for a histology test. By using photoacoustic imaging, surgeons can determine if all of the cancerous tissue has been removed, rather than wait for the standard tissue analysis to reveal the patient must undergo a second surgery. Although this method is still being worked on, it is faster than traditional methods and has the potential to be used during the operation.

View the complete article here.

3D virtual reality, the future for medical students

Source: ZD Net

Virtual reality has the potential to replace anatomy labs for many institutions, especially with technology that allows students to experience “mixed reality.” A UK company is taking current technology of viewing parts of the body in 3D to the next level, and is trying to provide a more hands-on atmosphere for learning. This company wants students to not only see the human body, but to get a sense of how the human body would feel by using haptic feedback. According to virtual reality companies, the possibilities are endless when it comes to using virtual reality to better medical procedures.

View the complete article here.